Et in Arcadia ego

“For we brought nothing into this world: and certainly we can carry nothing out.” I – Tim 6:7

Popular as no other spiritual originated theme in painting (but may be charity) appears Vanity and contemporary society loves this ‘cutest of sins’ more than any other one to reflex it’s feeling about existence. I love vanity in it’s purest appearence washed out of pride and egoism, and jelousy and arogance, I prefer to look on it not as one of sins but rather as one of passions. All art besides being artificial is vain and all honest and intelligent artist must asume the fact that art and creation itself is an act led by nothing than vanity and the desire to give an ego or at least a part of it the possibility of existence outside one’s proper being. Nothing but a search for being admired outside of creator’s person in creation – hence a wish of being admired not once as a being but twice as a being and as a creator through own creation is what makes all artist an perfect vanity adept and nothing but him. If all is vain and all is but vainty, art is a most beautiful example of this neverending incorrigible vanity of humanity.  Think of death and enjoy the present day!

Vanity

Michal Korman: Death’s head ( fruits and flowers) oilon canvas, 81×100 cm, 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: Death's head ( Toledo Cross) oil on canvas, 61x50 cm, 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: Death’s head ( Toledo Cross) oil on canvas, 61×50 cm, 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: Death's head with parakeet, oil on canvas, 61x50 cm, 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: Death’s head with parakeet, oil on canvas, 61×50 cm, 2013 Paris

 

Michal Korman: New World Monkey death, oil on canvas 81x65 cm 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: New World Monkey death, oil on canvas 81×65 cm 2013 Paris

 

Michal Korman: Skull (after Bonnard) oil on canvas, 81x65 cm 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: Skull ( Bonnard est mort) oil on canvas, 65×81 cm 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: Skull (after Bonnard) oil on canvas, 65x81 cm 2013 Paris

Michal Korman: Skull (Denis est mort) oil on canvas, 65×81 cm 2013 Paris

 

 

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