Anthropos

For a quiet a long-time already, I’ve been seeking an expression of universality of men in this world I could transform into an image. Understand me well: the human basis of Man was in my focus rather than the idea of beauty of a body, or allegory of potent humankind or it’s effect or whatever of a kind. There was a big struggle in me – a struggle for an accurate form that would not express a body as beautiful subject, but the meaning behind of what is allowed to be seen. It lasted for a while and it only comes to me now that I was in search of a form as simple and meaningful as Leonardo’s Vitruvian man or Michelangelo’s Adam in Sistine chapel, Rodin’s Walking man, Giacometti’s Walking man or Warhol’s Walking torso. I could have based my work on these but all those bear some idea of action or even concrete action it-self in them and this is what I didn’t want so show at all. I was looking for something more ‘evident’ – as if the action was not more than an added value on what the Man is; ancient Greek art was something that express this ‘evidence’ perfectly -especially torsos- and I’ve turned to it. Then the idea of ‘Anthropos metron’ appeared but the battle only was half-won. The language was to be set and this turned to be even more difficult than the search of a form’s been. It might have been ‘clean and clear’ as Greek marbles or Adam or Warhol’s torsos, which indeed would underline the idea of ‘Man’ as a ‘monument’, or it could also be more ‘deep’ and ‘mystical’ just like Rodin or Giacometti’s work – some kind of dark baroque-like transcended and spiritual testimony of what ‘Man’ beyond life is. Neither one nor the other suited to this as the ‘image’ should actually meet ‘life’ in my vision and the fact the hair should be apparent came to me to bound the ‘idea’ to ‘flesh’. The other thing is I not only wanted the ‘Man’ was depicted as an ‘evidence’ but also as ‘confrontation’ I’ve started to work on three pictures at the same time – without -when paintings put together- the ‘flesh’ part of my subject in one composition touching the ‘flash’ part in the other one. So paintings can be put apart or put together without taking advantage in one or other state of theirs.
Finally they can create and imaginary strip going towards infinity when side by side and logically act as some sort of a philosophical ‘monument’, or stand alone and remind and question as ‘art’. ‘Torso’ has changed the title and has become ‘Anthropos’ – always in singular.

Michal Korman: Anthropos, oil on canvas 81x65 cm, Paris 2015

Michal Korman: Anthropos, oil on canvas 81×65 cm, Paris 2015

 

Michal Korman: Anthropos, oil on canvas 81x65 cm, Paris 2015

Michal Korman: Anthropos, oil on canvas 81×65 cm, Paris 2015

 

Michal Korman: Anthropos, oil on canvas 81x65 cm, Paris 2015

Michal Korman: Anthropos, oil on canvas 81×65 cm, Paris 2015

 

Michal Korman: Anthropos, 3x oil on canvas 81x65 cm (each), Paris 2015

Michal Korman: Anthropos, 3x oil on canvas 81×65 cm (each), Paris 2015